All B vitamins help the body to convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which is used to produce energy. These B vitamins, often referred to as B-complex vitamins, also help the body metabolize fats and protein. B complex vitamins are necessary for a healthy liver, skin, hair, and eyes. They also help the nervous system function properly.

 

B1 – THIAMINE:

 

Thiamine is called an “anti-stress” vitamin because it strengthens the immune system and improves the body’s ability to withstand stressful conditions.

 

B2 – RIBOFLAVIN:

 

In addition to producing energy for the body, riboflavin works as an antioxidant, fighting damaging particles in the body known as free radicals. Free radicals can damage cells and DNA, and may contribute to the aging process, as well as the development of a number of health conditions, such as heart disease and cancer. Antioxidants, such as riboflavin, can fight free radicals and may reduce or help prevent some of the damage they cause. Riboflavin is also needed to help the body change vitamin B6 and folate into forms it can use. It is also important for growth and red blood cell production.

 

B3- NIACINAMIDE:

 

The Niacinamide form of B3 is literally required in hundreds of enzymatic reactions in the human body. Research has demonstrated its remarkable benefits for arthritis, asthma, diabetes, heart disease, stress, stroke and recently as an anti-aging nutrient.

 

B6 – PYRIDOXAL PHOSPHATE:

 

Vitamin B6 in coenzyme forms performs a wide variety of functions in the body and is extremely versatile, with involvement in more than 100 enzyme reactions, mostly concerned with protein metabolism [1].

 

Both PLP and PMP are involved in amino acid metabolism, and PLP is also involved in the metabolism of one-carbon units, carbohydrates, and lipids.

 

Vitamin B6 also plays a role in cognitive development through the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and in maintaining normal levels of homocysteine, an amino acid in the blood.

 

Vitamin B6 is involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis, immune function and hemoglobin formation.

 

B12 – CYANOCOBALAMIN:

 

The benefits of Cyanocobalamin are almost endless as this man-made vitamin is capable of so much. It assists in maintaining a strong and healthy nervous system, relieves weakness and fatigue, helps with all aspects of red blood cells from formation to repair and even maintenance, maintains proper heart functions, and helps treat sickle cell anemia. Other benefits of Cyanocobalamin include treating Alzheimer’s, prevention of anemia, formation of DNA, and prevention of breast cancer. While all of these benefits are amazing, the use of B12 is important part of our body’s functions.

 

METHIONINE:

 

L-methionine is an essential amino acid. It is responsible for a number of important body functions and plays a critical role in your body’s metabolism. It’s also a powerful antioxidant and as such helps fight free radicals in the body as well as slow the aging process.

 

Methionine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that is responsible for the production of collagen, which is known to help enhance the condition of skin, hair, and nails.

 

L-Methionine may also help boost your immune system, as high methionine levels in the body can also increase the levels of other amino acids such as glutathione, homocysteine, and taurine, which all play important roles in immune function. In addition, selenium and zinc cannot be absorbed by the body without the aid of L-Methionine.

 

Methionine also helps the body produce SAMe (S-Adenosyl-L-methionine), which has been used to treat psychiatric illnesses, infertility, liver problems, premenstrual disorders, and musculoskeletal conditions. Studies on SAMe have shown that it is as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in alleviating depression.

 

Ongoing studies that show promise are also being conducted to determine how effective L-Methionine may be for treating HIV/AIDS, liver damage, Parkinson’s disease, and urinary tract infections.

 

In addition, according to WebMD, L-Methionine is also used for…

 

  • increasing the acidity of urine
  • treating liver disorders
  • improving wound healing
  • treating depression
  • alcoholism
  • allergies
  • asthma
  • anti-aging effects
  • copper poisoning.

 

INOSITOL:

 

  • It promotes strong, health hair. One of the most talked about inositol benefits is how it benefits your hair. It’s a member of the B complex family which, as anybody who has studied will know, are known to promote strong hair, healthier hair, and faster growth.

 

  • It lowers cholesterol levels. One major health benefit of inositol is that when combined with choline, they produce lecithin in your body (which you can also obtain from soy lecithin). Lecithin is fundamental in breaking down fats in your body and this means that it can prevent fat build ups in the cell walls of your heart, arteries and brain by breaking down the fatty deposits. Less fat in your arteries, lower cholesterol.

 

  • It can treat depression and mood swings. The way inositol benefits depression, mood swings and to a lesser extent, bipolar disorder is very promising as well. Research has shown that those with low levels of inositol in their body have a higher chance of suffering any of these mental illnesses. Also, inositol is known to participate in the action of serotonin production in the brain and nerve systems that responds well to mood stabilizers. Put these together and you have a pretty great, natural antidepressant.

 

  • It can help babies with respiratory problems. A study published in the late 90’s has shown that inositol benefits new born babies with respiratory distress by significantly reducing death and disability. Inositol supplementation lowered rates of death, lung complications, brain bleeds, and eye problems with no real side effects. Further studies are ongoing, but if you are pregnant, speak to your doctor about adding inositol to your prenatal vitamins and they can recommend what you need to do to protect your child.

 

  • It might help fight against cancer. I know, I know. Everything has been linked to a cure for cancer. However, this is because the cure will not be one thing, but a combination of things that fight this disease. Inositol, for example, has been shown to have compounds with the criteria needed to treat and potentially prevent cancer. A few select studies in vitro have also shown that it may help — especially when combined with phytic acid.

 

  • It can help diabetes sufferers. Another great benefit of inositol (as part of the B-complex) is that it can have a positive impact on body cells. Diabetic neuropathy, a nerve disease which is the most frequent complication in diabetics, can be treated well using inositol supplements. Since most of the decreased nerve function is down to a loss of inositol in the cell, increasing your intake can ease the symptoms. It won’t cure the disease, but it will make it more bearable when combined with other diabetic neuropathy treatments.

 

It eases constipation. A lack of inositol in your system can cause excessive relaxation of the muscles in your intestines and alimentary canal, which leads to constipation. Inositol works to stimulate the muscular action and ease the pain of constipation. The same effects can be used in pregnant women to stimulate the muscular contractions in pregnancy to induce labor.

 

CHOLINE:

 

Choline is a macronutrient that’s important for liver function, normal brain development, nerve function, muscle movement, supporting energy levels and maintaining a healthy metabolism.

 

Choline is present in the form of phosphatidycholine, a compound that makes up the structural component of fat, and thus can be found in different types of foods that naturally contain certain fats. Choline plays a part in several important processes within the body that are carried out hundreds of times, every single day.

 

Choline is a water soluble nutrient that is related to other vitamins, such as folate and those in the B vitamin complex family. Just like B vitamins, choline plays a similar role in terms of supporting energy and brain function, as well as keeping the metabolism active.

 

What is choline most beneficial for? Choline helps in the process of methylation, which is used to create DNA, for nerve signaling, and for detoxification. It’s also important for the functioning of a key neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, which similarly helps nerves to communicate and muscles to move, acts as an anti-aging neurotransmitter, and performs other basic processes.

 

ASCORBIC ACID – VITAMIN C:

 

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, meaning that your body doesn’t store it. You have to get what you need from food, including citrus fruits, broccoli, and tomatoes.

 

You need vitamin C for the growth and repair of tissues in all parts of your body. It helps the body make collagen, an important protein used to make skin, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels. Vitamin C is needed for healing wounds, and for repairing and maintaining bones and teeth. It also helps the body absorb iron from other sources.

 

Vitamin C is an antioxidant, along with vitamin E, beta-carotene, and many other plant-based nutrients. Antioxidants block some of the damage caused by free radicals, substances that damage DNA. The build up of free radicals over time may contribute to the aging process and the development of health conditions such as cancer, heart disease, and arthritis.

 

It’s rare to be seriously deficient in vitamin C, although evidence suggests that many people may have low levels of vitamin C. Smoking cigarettes lowers the amount of vitamin C in the body, so smokers are at a higher risk of deficiency.

 

Signs of vitamin deficiency include dry and splitting hair; gingivitis (inflammation of the gums) and bleeding gums; rough, dry, scaly skin; decreased wound-healing rate, easy bruising; nosebleeds; and a decreased ability to ward off infection. A severe form of vitamin C deficiency is known as scurvy.

 

Low levels of vitamin C have been associated with a number of conditions, including high blood pressure, gallbladder disease, stroke, some cancers, and atherosclerosis, the build up of plaque in blood vessels that can lead to heart attack and stroke. Getting enough vitamin C from your diet — by eating lots of fruit and vegetables — may help reduce the risk of developing some of these conditions.

 

Vitamin C plays a role in protecting against the following:

 

Treatment of the Common Cold: Vitamin C enhances the immune system of our body, which protects us from colds and coughs. It facilitates the absorption of iron and therefore strengthens the body’s resistance to infection. It also fights against viruses.

 

Lowering Hypertension: People with hypertension are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The supplement of vitamin C intake helps in lowering the body’s blood pressure.

 

Treatment of Vasodilation: Treatment with vitamin C has effectively resulted in the proper dilation of blood vessels in the cases of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, high cholesterol, angina pectoris, and high blood pressure. Results have been found that supplements of vitamin C improve blood vessel dilation and protect cardiovascular health.

 

Cure of Lead Toxicity: Lead Toxicity is a severe health problem found mostly in children, especially in urban areas. Abnormal development and growth has been found in some children who are exposed to lead. They develop behavioral problems, learning disabilities and also tend to have a low IQ. It may damage the kidneys and increase blood pressure in adults. Vitamin C supplements can reduce the blood lead level.

 

Curing Cataracts (Eye Disorder): Cataracts are the most common conditions of visual problems. A decrease in the level of vitamin C in the lens of the human eye has been found more commonly when cataracts are present. An increase of vitamin C intake increases the blood supply to the ocular areas of the body.

 

Treatment of Cancer: Researchers have found that a high consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits have a link to a minimized risk for various types of cancer. Studies have also shown that increased consumption of vitamin C is connected with a decreased possibility of cancers of the lungs, mouth, vocal chords, throat, colon, rectum, stomach, and esophagus.

 

Combating Stroke: Vitamin C also helps in reducing the risk of stroke, a type of cardiovascular disease. A diet full of vegetables and fruits supplies a good quantity of vitamin C, which maintains the appropriate blood pressure level. It also protects the body from free radicals which could be the reason for the stroke.

 

Mood: Vitamin C plays a key role in the production of neurotransmitters, like norepinephrine. They affect the mood of a person, and they are critical to the proper functioning of the brain.

 

Immunity: Immunity is another important benefit of this vitamin. Vitamin C is widely known for its contribution to the immune system of the body and its stimulation of white blood vessels.

 

Wound Repair: Vitamin C also helps to repair wounds. It facilitates the growth of the connective tissues, which speeds up the process of healing wounds.

 

Other

Vitamin C may also be helpful for:

 

  • Boosting immunity
  • Maintaining healthy gums
  • Improving vision for those with uveitis (an inflammation of the middle part of the eye)
  • Treating allergy-related conditions, such as asthma, eczema, and hay fever (called allergic rhinitis)
  • Reducing effects of sun exposure, such as sunburn or redness (called erythema)
  • Alleviating dry mouth, particularly from antidepressant medications (a common side effect from these drugs)
  • Healing burns and wounds
  • Decreasing blood sugar in people with diabetes
  • Some viral conditions, including mononucleosis — Although scientific evidence is lacking, some doctors may suggest high-dose vitamin C to treat some viruses.